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Math Dictionary

Definitions for Fractions/Decimals

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Numerator: a numerator is the top number in a fraction.

Denominator: a denominator is the opposite of a numerator, it is the bottom number in a fraction.

Lowest terms: when a fraction is in lowest terms, the numerator has no more common factors with the denominator, and there for can not be divided any more.

Equivalent fractions: two or more fractions of equal value. To find equivalent fractions, multiply or divide the numerator and the denominator by the same number. For example (4/8)=(2/4) true or false? The question is true because is you divide the 1st fraction by 2, then it is equivelent to the 2nd fraction.

Mixed numbers: a mixed number contains both whole numbers and fractions. For example: 7 2/3.

 

Improper fractions: fractions with a value greater than 1. For example: 26/13. To find the value, simply divide the numerator by the denominator. 26 (divided by) 13 is equvialent to 2.

 

Adding fractions: to add fractions, make sure all fractions have a common denominator, then add the numerators and keep the denominators the same.

 

Subtracting fractions: to subtract fractions, make sure all fractions have a common denominator (just like adding), then subtract the numerators, and keep the denominators the same. For example: (2/4)-(4/8) is really (1/2)-(1/2)=(0/2).

 

Multiplying fractions: to multiply fractions, multiply the numerators together, and the denominators together. For example: (2/4)*(4/8)=(8/32)

 

Dividing fractions: when dividing fractions, invert (switch the denominator with the numorator) the second fraction, then multiply the numerators together, and the denominators together. For example: (2/9 3/12 = 2/9 * 12/3)

 

Converting fractions to decimals: Divide the numerator by the denominator.

 

Converting fractions to percents: divide the numerator by the denominator, then multiply by 100.

 

Converting fractions into ratios: one number in the ratio will be the numerator, and the other will either be the denominator, or the difference between the numerator and denominator. The order and whether to use the denominator or the difference between the numerator and denominator will depend on the context. For example: (9/1) in a ratio is: (9:1),(1:9),(8:1),(1:8).

 

Decimals to fractions:

 

Terminating fractions:
the last decimal place becomes the denominator, and all non-leading zero digits become the numerator. For example: 0.095=95/1000

 

Irrational decimals:
Irrational decimals cannot be made into fractions

 

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